A note from a disaster pastor

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There doesn’t seem to be many of us left on campus now. With the Woolsey Fire only 5% contained, Pepperdine decided to utilize remote learning options and not hold classes on the Malibu campus until after Thanksgiving break, so most all students have now safely headed home. It is a motley crew that remains, and we are standing strong together. We are tired, but fine, and our houses are probably safer than ever since the threatening fires scorched the surrounding hillsides so that there isn’t anything left there to burn. But the winds have returned, so we continue to watch and pray.

We currently have a front row seat to an impressive air show as planes and helicopters use our campus as staging area for their heroic efforts. I’m not exactly sure how I have been privileged to have a front row seat to the worst hurricane in American history and then the most destructive fires in California history some two thousand miles and thirteen years apart, but that is the way this life has played out. Someone called me the “disaster pastor,” which is probably both funny and an accurate way to describe my approach to things!

Our condo is fine but without WiFi, so we are on lower campus often to communicate with the outside world and to eat together and be together as a community. I sat down at my office desk this afternoon to try to write and noticed my breathing mask next to my Pepperdine Waves hat. The absurdity reminded me of the craziness of these past few days: a horrible, horrible mass shooting targeting college students followed by raging wildfires.

It is strange to say that I am glad to be here. I was glad to be in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, thirteen years ago when a group of people I loved were threatened and vulnerable, and I am glad to be in Malibu, California, today for the same reason. The word “pastor” is just another word for a shepherd, and a shepherd is there to protect and care for sheep. That doesn’t have to be your job title, of course. It is more of a posture, and it feels like such an honor to be there for others in times of vulnerability. I am surrounded here with like-minded people, including the leadership of this great university, although my wife might just be the best pastor I know.

I never learned the source, but I remember reading a couplet from a poem as a young man that took my breath away and seems to have shaped the trajectory of my adult life that said:

Some want to live within the sound of church and steeple bell.
I want to run a rescue shop within a yard of hell.

That still gets me after all these years.

Keep praying for our area if you don’t mind: for those who have lost so much, for those who are still in danger, and for those who are fighting fires of all kinds. We will be strong and make it together.

4 responses to “A note from a disaster pastor

  1. Great post Al. Glad you are ok

    Donna

    On Sun, Nov 11, 2018 at 5:10 PM Starting to Look Up wrote:

    > Al Sturgeon posted: ” There doesn’t seem to be many of us left on campus > now. With the Woolsey Fire only 5% contained, Pepperdine decided to utilize > remote learning options and not hold classes on the Malibu campus until > after Thanksgiving break, so most all students have no” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh my dear friend, Al. You are called to this work , and I thank God for your presence where you are needed and I am thankful you were there for me when I needed you. May God continue to bless your amazing work.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Al,
    God seems to know the best people to be in the right places at the right times. You are such a person . Hope all are safe and know that you and yours are in my prayers.

    God bless you,
    Brett Carlile

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Claudia Sangster

    Appreciate your words, Al. So glad you are safe! Will continue to pray as you requested!

    Liked by 1 person

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