An Opinion That Matters

68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 18: Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus accepts Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for ‘Veep’ onstage during the 68th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 18, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

We watched the Emmy Awards last Sunday evening only later to learn that it experienced the worst ratings ever for the show.  This demonstrates my personal sense of timing.  Watching the star-studded event also confirmed my complete ignorance of popular television shows.  For instance, I didn’t know that O.J. Simpson had a new reality show that pits everyone against him, and apparently there is a popular game show all about thrones.  I have a lot of catching up to do.

At the Emmys, Jimmy Kimmel was funny what with his peanut butter and jelly sandwich distribution shtick, and Henry Winkler did a fine job hosting the touching annual tradition of the in memoriam video.  But to me, the most poignant moment of the evening came when Julia Louis-Dreyfus accepted the award for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series (for Veep—it turns out that is a television show, too).

The legendary actress’s speech was funny and to be honest pretty typical until the very end when she broke down in tears and said, “I’d like to dedicate this to my father, William Louis-Dreyfus, who passed away on Friday.  I’m so glad he liked Veep because his opinion was the one that really mattered.”

Louis-Dreyfus’s speech apparently struck a chord with an awful lot of people despite the record-low number of viewers.  Her speech led many to tweet expressions of sadness to famed actor, Richard Dreyfuss, wrongly assuming that he was Julia’s father, which is actually sort of funny.  Almost as funny as tweeting someone you think died two days earlier.

But her sweet statement begs a sincere question: Whose opinion really matters to you?  I suspect that the true answer to that question involves a really small number of folks, but I also suspect that we live as if that number is massive.  We are more than a little screwy.

If I can be so bold, I suggest taking some time to consider the real answer to that question—and live accordingly.

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4 responses to “An Opinion That Matters

  1. Al,

    Tweeting someone whom you believe is deceased raises several questions. Do the senders believe that tweets actually reach those in the “afterlife”? If so, how does that work? If one is in the preferred afterlife location, does he/she only receive positive, happy, encouraging tweets? Etc.

    RONALD F. PHILLIPS SENIOR VICE CHANCELLOR & SCHOOL OF LAW DEAN EMERITUS PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY MALIBU, CALIFORNIA 90263 ronald.phillips@pepperdine.edu 310-506-4951

    On Fri, Sep 23, 2016 at 4:31 AM, Starting to Look Up wrote:

    > Al Sturgeon posted: ” We watched the Emmy Awards last Sunday evening only > later to learn that it experienced the worst ratings ever for the show. > This demonstrates my personal sense of timing. Watching the star-studded > event also confirmed my complete ignorance of popular ” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent questions! And I wonder if tweeting is available in either location. #sureishotinhere or #sothisiswhattheymeanbythecloud

    Like

  3. Great piece! Heard this speech too and loved it.. gets you really thinkin’ huh? Great seeing you this week, looking forward to the next time! Mike

    On Fri, Sep 23, 2016 at 4:31 AM, Starting to Look Up wrote:

    > Al Sturgeon posted: ” We watched the Emmy Awards last Sunday evening only > later to learn that it experienced the worst ratings ever for the show. > This demonstrates my personal sense of timing. Watching the star-studded > event also confirmed my complete ignorance of popular ” >

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks, Mike! So good to see you, too! Hope for many more opportunities soon.

    Like

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